the sense of a goose

The Fullfledge Ecology School is a Steiner ‘inspired’ school in the UK. It is applying for free school status. Melanie Byng writes about the school in this post over at the Suffolk Humanists’ blog. For some reason the school wants to be a Steiner school and not be a Steiner school, at the same time. This is not very commendable. One must give them some credit for posting this hilarious piece of writing on geese, though.

If we have as much sense as a goose, we will stay in formation with those people who are headed the same way we are.

This attitude, one might note, could equally well lead to disaster as to success, especially if headed in a bad direction… In this case, I guess, they’re only heading towards increased nonsense. So, more on the geese:

Geese honk from behind to encourage those up front to keep up their speed.

What message do we give when we honk from behind?

I can’t possibly tell, but I don’t have the sense of a goose, nor do I fly in a formation, nor am I trying to open a non-Steiner Steiner school. What is the message? Would anybody care to guess?

11 thoughts on “the sense of a goose

  1. I can’t believe the DfE takes these people seriously. The fact that they’ve called them for interview suggests desperation or that someone in the department really is a goose. Honk honk!

    ‘What message do we give when we honk from behind?’

    That we’re in a lot of trouble. So much trouble that words fail us.

  2. What message do we give when we honk from behind?’
    Stop, turn around, you’re going the wrong way!

  3. Honk, Honk. The Canada geese who have taken to wintering over in my home town get culled by the poor working class to grace their dinner tables at christmas.

    However I am really posting to comment on this ‘Biography’ from the Fullfledge site –

    “Steiner was born in 1861 in a small village in an area which is now part of Croatia but which, at the time, was part of the Austro-Hungarian empire. His father was the village stationmaster. He worked his way through the Austrian educational system and by the time he was in his twenties had become an accomplished linguist, classical scholar, mathematician, scientist and historian.
    In addition to his academic studies Rudolf Steiner worked as a private tutor, which is perhaps where he formed his ideas about the methods most appropriate for the teaching of children.
    He was a prolific writer and lecturer and became a major figure in the German-speaking world of that time. ‘

    That’s it!
    It astonishes me that anyone can write about Steiner without mentioning his clairvoyance, – the source of his revelation and insights.

    A wonderful example of no-one wanting to talk about the elephant in the room.

    But with potentially dire consequences.

    If they want to disassociate themselves from Steiner’s clairvoyance why not say something like –
    ‘We do not recognise Rudolf Steiner’s claimed source for his insights (clairvoyance) but we believe that from a pragmatic point of view his educational practice is a good basis for the education of children.’?

    At least this would be honest.

  4. Well, for me, there’s a LOT to be said about flying out of formation… especially when relating to students. Isn’t that what makes us “individuals”? Flying out of formation is something Waldorf objects to in children (not just geese). Every child must fit perfectly into the Waldorf mold. This is extended to parents too. Fly a little out of formation and you risk your child’s education. Honk too much and they might expel your child.

  5. Flying out of formation is frowned upon in the steiner world. The analogy fits their [steiner] paradigm really well. “Ours is the way, the only way.” Where have I heard that before?

  6. Honk, honk!

    I wish there were more poor middle class willing to kill and eat Canada geese here on Östermalm. We could certainly get rid of a few. Or many.

    Yes, that’s an interesting Steiner biography. They almost always neglect to mention certain things, of course. But this bio is long. And you wonder how words ‘accomplished linguist, classical scholar, mathematician, scientist and historian’ could be used to describe him while something like ‘spiritual leader’ (or really anything indicating his major accomplishment with theosophy/anthroposophy) is left out. It doesn’t make sense, and even less so for a steiner school that doesn’t even want to be a ‘proper’ steiner school.

    Which is another thing I don’t get.

    ‘In addition to his academic studies Rudolf Steiner worked as a private tutor, which is perhaps where he formed his ideas about the methods most appropriate for the teaching of children.’

    Completely silly notion — much, if not all, of it is based on anthroposophical insights, or at least interpreted in the light of these insights.

  7. Steiner only tutored two children. So, I’m guessing if he got his insights from his tutoring, there might only be two temperaments. ;)

  8. oh it’s all such twaddle.

    Falk wisely adds:

    ‘It astonishes me that anyone can write about Steiner without mentioning his clairvoyance, – the source of his revelation and insights.
    A wonderful example of no-one wanting to talk about the elephant in the room.
    But with potentially dire consequences.’

    This is double dishonesty, though I imagine there are some well-meaning people on the Fullfledge team who really don’t understand what they’re involved in. Mr Van-Manen doesn’t have that excuse.

    Unlike Falk I don’t think Steiner was clairvoyant. I applaud your honesty though, Falk.

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